Posts Tagged sunflowers

Sunflowers

dewy sunflower

dewy sunflower

Sunflowers are the most beautiful crop when they are in bloom. All year, I look forward to the cheery bright yellow blossoms that appear in August and early September. Last year was a wonderful year for sunflower pictures and this year promises to be another such year. We’ve had poor crops since about 1997. Some years they were so poor that I didn’t even bother to take pictures. Crops were too poor to be photogenic.

I was quite surprised to see the dampness on this flower. I took the picture in late afternoon when all dew should have been gone. No irrigation equipment was in evidence, either.

bug on sunflower

bug on sunflower

I’m always amazed how many insects populate the world. It’s hard to escape them.

grasshopper on leaf

I particularly loathe grasshoppers. Their habit of jumping on a person and slobbering tobacco juice saliva is beyond disgusting, as well as the feel of the bristles on their legs. Ewwww! Worst of all is the fact that they voraciously eat vegetation. A swarm of them will denude everything growing and some things that aren’t.

doing what comes naturally

doing what comes naturally

Insects are prolific little things, always doing what comes naturally. This looks rather uncomfortable, but then, I’m not a bug. Thank God!

quarter of a sunflower head

quarter of a sunflower head

Looking at the florets on this sunflower head reminded me of my Sunflower Rising image. I showed it to some visitors one day. “Look, these are Fibonacci numbers that we’ve just studied!”

I love order in the universe. It’s comforting.

Check out my sunflower slide show on my new photo store site:

If you buy them, the watermark will no longer be present.

PS: Happy Birthday, Marilyn.

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Inside Holy Cross Church

View down the nave toward the apse

View down the nave toward the apse

This is the view that awaits those who push on the door that ended the post before this, about Holy Cross Catholic Church, Pfeifer, Kansas.

Balcony view

Balcony view

The church was built during World War I. Stained glass windows were impossible to find, so the original windows were frosted glass. Interior was left unpainted. This state of affairs continued until 1962. The parish priest at that time, ironically named Sinner, was determined to decorate the church.

Windows viewed from the vestible arch

Windows viewed from the vestibule arch

The paint brings out the wonderful “bones” of the church and the stained glass windows are its glory.

Window depicting Creation and Noah’s Ark

Window depicting Creation and Noah

In the days of near-total illiteracy, stained glass windows told the story of the Bible. Even now, the beautiful glass tells the story in ways preaching cannot.

Altar and fence

Altar and choir screen

The choir screen is beautifully carved.

harvest

The screen’s gates are also beautifully carved. This detail is of harvest. Another tells the story of the Five Loaves and Two Fishes.

Tabernacle

Tabernacle

I hope I didn’t commit some massive sacrilegious act by moving the candle that stood in front of the tabernacle. I could not photograph the gorgeous details here without moving it. I presume the metal is bronze. Once I took its picture, I immediately replaced the candle.

Priest holding a rosary

Priest holding a rosary

I am not a Catholic, so this priest’s identity is unknown to me. Altar piece details were exceedingly difficult to photograph. The gingerbread — if that’s the correct word for altar decorations — blocked my efforts to photograph the crucifix. I brought a step stool, but I needed a ladder. The hand-carved figures were acquired from Munich, Germany, in 1922.

Pieta

Pieta

The Pieta in the transept caught my attention. I’ve seen better Pieta sculptures, but this one better captures some of the extreme grief she must have felt. Jesus’ body is always sanitized in these depictions, but we probably could not bear to look upon a true depiction of His broken body.

Church and crops in stained window

Church and crops in stained window

Not all the decorations are strictly ecclesiastical. This transept window shows the church and its parishioners’ livelihood. I doubt Kansans were growing crops of sunflowers when this window was installed, so the sunflower is almost certainly a symbol of the state.

Trifoil window

Trifoil window

I’ve learned some new vocabulary as I’ve been blogging about this church and I have to show it off here. This window above one of the doors leading into the transepts is topped by a trifoil window.

The church was stifling and we had to leave before the heat overcame us. A pity, too, because I was not finished photographing it. I intend to return.

Holy Cross Church slide show is below.

To order from this slide show, click on the slide show’s gallery link or go here.

GHTime Code(s): nc c6f9a 28184 nc nc nc nc 

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“Al Capone was here”

Wendy’s vinyl siding took a beating in Monday evening’s storm. So did her sunflowers. “It looks like someone sprayed it with a tommy gun!”

Just goes to show how everything here on earth is transient.

My mother had a plaque that said “Only one life, ’twill soon be past. Only what’s done for Christ will last.”

Looking at the storm damage brings that poem to mind.

It’s a piece of a much larger poem, Only One Life, by missionary C.T. Studd:

Two little lines I heard one day, Traveling along life’s busy way;
Bringing conviction to my heart, And from my mind would not depart;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yes only one, Soon will its fleeting hours be done;
Then, in ‘that day’ my Lord to meet, And stand before His Judgment seat;
Only one life,’ twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, the still small voice, Gently pleads for a better choice
Bidding me selfish aims to leave, And to God’s holy will to cleave;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, a few brief years, Each with its burdens, hopes, and fears;
Each with its clays I must fulfill, living for self or in His will;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

When this bright world would tempt me sore, When Satan would a victory score;
When self would seek to have its way, Then help me Lord with joy to say;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Give me Father, a purpose deep, In joy or sorrow Thy word to keep;
Faithful and true what e’er the strife, Pleasing Thee in my daily life;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Oh let my love with fervor burn, And from the world now let me turn;
Living for Thee, and Thee alone, Bringing Thee pleasure on Thy throne;
Only one life, “twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yes only one, Now let me say, “Thy will be done”;
And when at last I’ll hear the call, I know I’ll say ‘twas worth it all”;
Only one life,’ twill soon be past, Only what’s done for Christ will last.

No matter how we try, we cannot protect ourselves from loss, whether from the human Al Capones of this world or the forces of nature. But we can send treasures up to heaven, where neither thieves, moths nor rust are present. (Matthew 6:19-20)

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